Friday, July 30, 2021

Driverless carriage

 "How do those horseys know what to do?"



I rode 32 miles on this section of the Ohio to Erie 
Rail-Trail, but I had to drive 24 miles to get onto it.
It is just a continuation of the 45 miles of trail that I
have easy access to, however there is an eight mile break
in the Rail-Trail that is very hilly and curvey highway.  I am
not about to ride on it, so I had to drive to get on to 
this part.  
It is the longest section of shared horse and buggy trail.
The Amish do not ever want their pictures taken, and
I respect their wishes. So I took the photo after it went
past me.  However, I should have taken it from the front.
The Amish have a long ride from one end of the trail
to get to the town with a Walmart. So they start out
early and then take a nap. Yes, the driver was sound
asleep at the reins. 
I'm not sure how it works out, if the person wakes up 
when the horse stops or if the horse stops only if the person
wakes up.  No matter which, there are road intersections
that must be crossed.


This is a train depot in the town with the Walmart. It is probably a little city
the size of mine. And under the new roof and siding, this is the original
depot built in 1853..
I still find it remarkable that I ride on the same rail that my father-in-law
road as a brakeman and conductor from late 1940's until 1980.



"Ya know, Lynn, your stories put me to sleep
faster'n a buggy ride."

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It is much appreciated.




Friday, July 23, 2021

Now you see me, now you don't

 "I'm looking out at you Lynn. But I'll soon disappear."


She's looking out thru the patio door as I am watering
the patio flowers and filling the bird baths. 
Precious is a good supervisor. As all supervisors,
she gives the orders and over sees the work but does 
not lift a paw to help. So why do supervisors get paid more?


By the time I get away from the door, it can be difficult
for me to even see if she is still there.  If it were not for
her eyes on this particular day, she'd be literally "out of sight".


From Precious' viewing point, this Red Shoulder Hawk is taking a bath
in the small herd animal water trough. These hawks live here year
round and are our 2nd largest.  The Red Tail Hawk is the largest.
I keep this larger watering spot out for the hawk and the deer.
However, the plastic dishes I use for song birds are hit hard during
hot weather by the deer.  I find them licked dry and used for frisbees
when they get frustrated.

Thank you for stopping by for a visit and a comment.
It is appreciated.




Friday, July 16, 2021

Handy work

 "So, is this angel baby as sweet as me, Lynn? After all

aren't I your sweetie-pie honey-bunch snookems?"



That you definitely are, Precious.
However this angel baby was just one of the projects
I brought home this Spring from the volunteer sewing store.


I took a close up picture of the price tag of what I paid, $1.50.
But I wanted to show that when this complete kit was put on the
shelf somewhere, around 1992 according to the fine print on
the package, it was priced at $6.00.
 I can honestly say in 1992, I would never have spent $6 on this
fun but simple kit.  Back then my hourly wage might have been
as much as $6 an hour before tax.  And basically I am a 
penny pincher in every aspect.


I had her finished before the "great visit" took place. 
Now to go through my stash and decide the next project.




"How about just time for me only, Lynn. You know I want 
my hair brushed."


You're next, Precious, after I show off one of our 
freshly hatched Black Swallowtail butterflies.  So called
for the tails on the lower wings.  We have 1/2 dozen different
species in Ohio, and most are predominantly black, but
one is more yellow, and one is more white.






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It is appreciated.









Friday, July 9, 2021

Always with the new bag

 "Look what came home! A crinkly bag! I love it, Lynn."


Precious loves a new large and crisp sounding plastic bag.
Why else go shopping?  I certainly wouldn't want to shop
for myself if I couldn't get the bag. And why did I waste
the money on a pretty velveteen crinkle bag from the pet
store a year ago?  Precious never even investigated it. But
this thing, we play frog on it in the evening.
 And now  while I drink my tea trying
to look out into the yard for wildlife, Precious loves to lay
on the bag. I have a laser beam to use to get her playing, 
but honestly, she prefers I wad up bits of paper and throw
them onto the bag for her to bat about and chase, momentarily.
Of course, when play time is over as it brightens up outside, I
then have to collect the paper wads and off she goes to sleep
off all that play time.


I always put the bag away at night and when I am going
to leave the house. I would never trust her with it alone.
Plastic is dangerous for her to get inside without my
supervision. And she does open it and go in and then
it is licky-licky-licky and chewy crunch-chewy crunch
on the bag. 




"Thanks, Lynn, you knew I'd love it. The bag is
the cat's meow."

By the way, I have removed all other of her bags
off the floor for now. She has way too many to 
keep her interest.
Her new bed is now just a large toy box.  We will
see what winter brings.





This is Butterfly Weed. An Ohio native plant in the milkweed
family.  The Monarch butterflies eat this to the ground, but thankfully,
the 4 or 5 I have come back every year. I've only recently seen
the arriving Monarchs back in the yard.

"I'm glad too, Lynn.  I love watching out front for the 
butterflies in the sunshine."


Not sure when we can expect the trees across the road to be clear cut.
The owner found me working in my garden last week and introduced
himself.  He said the builder can start in 2 months if the lot is cleared
by then.  The builder suggests a "clean slate" to work with. In my
opinion, that makes it easier for him to store his equipment and building
supplies.  The owner said he'd like to keep a few trees.  So for now,
Precious and I enjoy having windows open but listen for the sound
of heavy equipment constantly.

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It is much appreciated.



Friday, July 2, 2021

One big sand box

 "Lynn, is that a giant cat box, for private kitty stuff?"



I ride by this sand quarry on 90% of my bike rides.
The family owned business has been here for 30 years,
digging up sand and river gravel. 


The picture does not do justice for the size of the dredge.

When I first started riding here 15 years ago, the pit and lake
it created, were 1/2 mile away.  In the past 5 years, they
have moved into a farm field and  the corn and soy have
been replaced by water from the underground aquifer. 
And the mountains of sand are growing by leaps and bounds.


This had been 1,000 acre crop field.  But I know that
the sand and gravel is needed and used for all types
of construction.  
It can be very dusty when I bike past. As the large earth
moving trucks run the private road next to the Rail-Trail
right of way, the cloud of sandy dust is really bad.


"See why I prefer to stay home and get my sunshine
without the yuck of getting dirty?  By the way,
have you cleaned my potty box?"


And lastly, this yard ornament was waiting for me when I
returned from my bike ride, at my garage.  It is a yearling
and they do have a bit of a stressful time now, as their mothers
are now nursing the new fawns. So these girls and boys feel
left out.  As soon as the does bring out the new fawns, they all
finally spend time together. However, the yearlings have not
forgotten how good mother's milk is and try to get a sip occasionally.
Mom takes care of them in a way that would put me in the hospital
with cracked ribs or skull.  But the young take it well and are
soon obedient.




These lilies grow where my sweet Seney has now
rested for 8 1/2 years. Never ever forgotten.


Her last day with me.



Thank you for stopping by for a visit and a comment.
It is appreciated.









Tales Told by Precious

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